Home health Long working hours are killing more and more people – World

Long working hours are killing more and more people – World

by drbyos

A study by the World Health Organization and the International Labor Organization shows that every year more and more people die of a heart attack or stroke as a result of working hours that are too long.

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Labor Organization (ILO), a United Nations organization concerned with labor issues, joined forces to map out work-related burdens. For this they conducted research in 194 countries in 2000, 2010 and 2016. The results were published in the scientific journal on Monday Environment International.

Long working week makes more victims

In the study, a working week of at least 55 hours is considered long. The WHO and ILO have figures showing that long working hours cost the lives of some 745,000 people in 2016, an increase of 29 percent compared to 2000 figures. Five years ago 398,000 people died from a stroke and 347,000 people. of a heart attack. An increase of 19 and 42 percent respectively compared to 2000. According to the researchers, both causes of death are the result of a long working week.

Asian countries hardest hit

Work-related deaths mainly affect men and people living in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, a region of 28 countries located between China and New Zealand. The most victims are between the ages of 60 and 79 and worked at least 55 hours per job when they were between the ages of 45 and 74. The research thus underlines that the consequences of long working weeks do not surface until later in life.

New trend creates more risk

The WHO and ILO calculated that a long working week increases the risk of stroke and heart attack by 35 and 17 percent, respectively, compared to a less strenuous working week of 35 to 40 hours. However, a long working week is fashionable, the researchers postulate. After all, 9 percent of the world’s population currently works at least 55 hours a week, a trend that places more and more people in the risk group.

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Corona does not bode well

Although WHO and ILO completed the investigation before the pandemic outbreak, researchers are concerned about the tendency of longer working hours driving the virus. According to Tedron Ghebreyesus, the director general of the World Health Organization, teleworking blurs the line between home and work. The Ethiopian says the pandemic has caused problems for many companies, forcing them to put people out on the street. Employees who were allowed to stay now often fold themselves and work longer and longer.

“No job is worth the risk of a stroke or heart attack. Governments, employers and workers must work together to maintain the health of workers, ”said Ghebreyesus. Spanish doctor and diplomat Maria Neira, who is also banned from the WHO health department, shares this concern: ‘Working 55 hours a week is a huge health risk. It is high time that everyone became aware that long working weeks can lead to a much too early death. ‘

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Labor Organization (ILO), a United Nations organization concerned with labor issues, joined forces to map out work-related burdens. To this end, they conducted research in 194 countries in 2000, 2010 and 2016. The results were published Monday in the scientific journal Environment International. In the study, a working week of at least 55 hours is considered long. The WHO and ILO have figures showing that long working hours cost the lives of some 745,000 people in 2016, an increase of 29 percent compared to 2000 figures. Five years ago 398,000 people died from a stroke and 347,000 people. of a heart attack. An increase of 19 and 42 percent respectively compared to 2000. According to the researchers, both causes of death are the result of a long working week. Work-related deaths mainly affect men and people living in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, a region of 28 countries located between China and New Zealand. The most victims are between the ages of 60 and 79 and worked at least 55 hours per job when they were between the ages of 45 and 74. The research thus underlines that the consequences of long working weeks do not surface until later in life. The WHO and ILO calculated that a long working week increases the risk of stroke and heart attack by 35 and 17 percent, respectively, compared to a less strenuous working week of 35 to 40 hours. However, a long working week is fashionable, the researchers postulate. After all, 9 percent of the world’s population currently works at least 55 hours a week, a trend that places more and more people in the risk group. Although WHO and ILO completed the investigation before the pandemic outbreak, researchers are concerned about the tendency of longer working hours driving the virus. According to Tedron Ghebreyesus, the director general of the World Health Organization, teleworking blurs the line between home and work. The Ethiopian says the pandemic has caused problems for many companies, forcing them to put people out on the street. Employees who were allowed to stay now often fold and work longer and longer. ‘No job is worth the risk of a stroke or heart attack. Governments, employers and workers must work together to maintain the health of workers, ”said Ghebreyesus. Spanish doctor and diplomat Maria Neira, who is also banned from the WHO health department, shares this concern: ‘Working 55 hours a week is a huge health risk. It is high time that everyone became aware that long working weeks can lead to a much too early death. ‘

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